Got (Almond) Milk?

As my first post for Tea Tuesday (yep, it’s on a Tuesday now [for better alliteration!]), I thought I would speak (or type?) about milk.

You know. Milk. That creamy, white liquid that comes out of a (female, not male ;)) cow?*

Or out of almonds…

Or cashews…

Or coconuts…

Or soy…

In fact, it seems you can get ‘milk’ out of just about anything these days and hell no, I am not complaining about that beautiful thing!

milk

Because, since I went full-time vegan (instead of part-time vegan, part-time vegetarian, as usual for me) for the duration of Lent last year (which I will be doing again this year, keep an eye out for posts!), it resulted in my drastically cutting back on the amount of dairy products I consumed after the 40 days. So instead of full-fat milk lattes from fancy coffee shops, I now have soy ones. Instead of adding regular milk in recipes, I now typically add almond. And instead of evaporated milk in tea, I now have any manner of milk – as long as it doesn’t come from an animal. Going vegan for those 40 days was one of the best challenges I’ve ever undertaken (and believe me, it was a challenge!) and I would love to do it full-time, but damn, I love cake so much.

But the point of this post is not to bemoan my lack of self-control, it’s to talk about milk, a component so important in the making of my favourite black tea (Twinings Earl Grey, have I said that before?). Like my mum, I used to add evaporated milk in my tea, but now I typically have almond in its place. I’ve had rice milk (too sweet!), coconut milk (too thin!) and hazelnut milk (unusual flavour) in teas, but for me, nothing beats the neutral taste of almond milk.

So really, the point of this post is to ask, what’s your choice of milk for tea? You know mine, but I’d like to know yours. Are you a goats milk fan? A regular cows milk? Or do you prefer the taste of non-dairy and like a splash of soy? Do you use different milks for different teas? Or just different milks for different purposes in general? Maybe a one milk for all fits you? Either way, my vote goes to almond milk, that lovely, unassuming thing.

*So my Dad told me that all cows that offer milk are in fact, female, as the male alternative are bulls. Damn, I knew that 😀 But as he says, he ‘critiques content.’ ❤

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15 thoughts on “Got (Almond) Milk?

  1. I love trying different tea even on my travels. On a daily routine I have Green and earl grey. But in morning I can’t live without my Indian tea (adding cow milk). but we usually mix it with grated ginger and Tulsi (herbal aromatic leaves) which we usually grow in planters of our balconies….they are refreshing! Thanks for sharing! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Really?? Indian tea with ginger and Tulsi? Sounds gooooooood! I’d love to make that. I bought back some masala chai powder, would I just add some ginger to it? (I don’t have Tulsi :() Do you add milk to your earl grey? I find that I seem to be one of the few who do??

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes. I prepare that every day! 🙂 Masala chai is also nice, yes you grate a small piece of ginger first (very fine gratings) boil it in water for few seconds till its starts boiling up, then add tea and again boil it for few seconds and add Milk eventually…after this let it boil it for 2-3minite on a light flame (but just before it starts becoming little dark don’t let that happen ) …then use tea strainers to pour it in the cup and enjoy the sip! ….and no I don’t add Milk in early grey (should I do that 🤔) ..what’s your best tea option? 🙂

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  2. I used to love milk with tea when I was very young. I grew up in Calcutta and worked in Delhi thereafter for a fair bit of my life. So I used to travel frequently by rail between the two. During those journeys, I would savour sweet milk tea spiced up with ginger and cardamom and served in small clay pots (which I believe made it even better). I do not know if I can still enjoy it as much given that I started enjoying my tea without milk or sugar. I somehow feel that the flavour of the tea leaves is taken away by adding anything to it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I love tea in clay pots too (maybe I should buy some?? Haha) And that’s very true – I think that additions tend to take away most of the flavour, but I suppose that’s how potent it is to begin with. Mind you, I’ve had a fair few teas that are actually enhanced with sugar and milk. But the addition of cardamom that you used to have? Sounds utterly delicious. Thanks for commenting! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. You are welcome. I have three cups of green tea everyday so needless to say I am kinda tied to tea. I have to relate this incident that took place recently when we took our friends from California to a Le Pain Quotidien in London. One of them ordered ‘masala chai’ with great gusto. A dainty white tea pot arrived in front of her. In it was a tea bag ( that proclaimed it to be masala chai) floating in hot water. She did a double take. I asked her, “Did you expect chai boiled in a pan for you with milk and cardamom?” Needless to point out the gobsmacked look on her face, you can guess very well what her answer was.

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      2. Hahahahahahaha! You know, this was my first experience of ‘chai’ too, but at another French chain! I genuinely thought it was the real thing until I went to university and one of my housemates asked if I wanted a cup of tea. I said yes, thinking he was going to pop the kettle on, but 10 minutes later I had this beautiful cup with milk, cardamom, ginger, etc. and I’ve never looked back, haha. (In fact, I still have these bloody teabag “chais” in my cupboard from the times of ignorance!)

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Ha ha ha! Another one bit the dust but then she recovered 😉 Well done for at least finding the real deal. I am sure not many know it unless they have travelled to India or have an Indian connection somehow through a friend, relative, acquaintance…here’s to masala chai then and all teas.

        Liked by 1 person

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